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  1. #1
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    Need Shearwall Nailing Schedule (table)

    Would anyone happen to have a table (shear wall schedule)showing Panel edge nailing, sill plate thickness, anchor bolts,sill plate nailing, etc.etc.with a column showing the maximum allowable shear. for each configuration (diaphram). I'm not asking for much!!!!!! Bob Levin

  2. #2
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    Bob:

    Here's one the builder gave me, maybe it's one you can use ?

    HTH

    Lew
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    Lew Buttery
    Castle Golden Design - "We make dreams visible"

    Lockport, NY
    716-434-5051
    www.castlegoldendesign.com
    lbuttery at castlegoldendesign.com

    CHIEF X5 (started with v9.5)

  3. #3
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    Lew
    Thanks for that.I don't think it is what he wants.That was for regular construction,he looking for shear panels..
    I have seen the chart some place..
    .........

    Allen Colburn Jr.
    Pascoag RI 02859
    Residential Design Drafting/Framer

    Drafter for:
    http://www.artformhomeplans.com/

    Chief Architect X4






  4. #4
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    Sorry, I saw "nailing schedule" and didn't pay attention to "shear wall"

    I too have seen one of those somewhere, I'll see if I can locate it.

    Lew
    Lew Buttery
    Castle Golden Design - "We make dreams visible"

    Lockport, NY
    716-434-5051
    www.castlegoldendesign.com
    lbuttery at castlegoldendesign.com

    CHIEF X5 (started with v9.5)

  5. #5
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    Portsmouth, NH; boston area
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    When do you need it? I have that, but it's in the server that we unplugged yesterday for my office move - won't be on line again until next week.

    Or - check out this web site - scroll to "N"...
    http://www.mcvicker.com/vwall/dti.htm
    Wendy Lee Welton
    Lic: NH, ME, NY, MA, NCARB

    603-431-9559

    www.artformarchitecture.com
    www.artformhomeplans.com

    I wrote code in 1984 to make my Sinclair 100 - so I used to be a programmer! So I can say with authority how easy it is to program Chief features! ;-)

  6. #6
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    Wendy:

    Nice site, I like the Residential Guide also:

    http://www.mcvicker.com/resguide/page000.htm

    So much info to study, so little time

    Lew
    Lew Buttery
    Castle Golden Design - "We make dreams visible"

    Lockport, NY
    716-434-5051
    www.castlegoldendesign.com
    lbuttery at castlegoldendesign.com

    CHIEF X5 (started with v9.5)

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Levin
    Would anyone happen to have a table (shear wall schedule)showing Panel edge nailing, sill plate thickness, anchor bolts,sill plate nailing, etc.etc.with a column showing the maximum allowable shear. for each configuration (diaphram). I'm not asking for much!!!!!! Bob Levin
    Umm, shouldn't you be getting this from your engineer?
    Richard
    ---------------
    Richard Morrison
    Architect-Interior Designer
    X6 Premier, Win8 64
    http://www.richardmorrison.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    [QUOTE=RMorrison]Umm, shouldn't you be getting this from your engineer

    Richard:
    Actually I was able get plans approved by Ventura Co a few months ago. for a 475 sq ft single story addition without engineering. The plan checker was nice enough to mark in where he wanted more shear walls. I made simple notes on the plans. STHD14 at the corners, Min 2 AB per Panel. Nailing 3" oc in perimeter and edge etc.. Anyway I was lucky enought to get approval without an engineer stamp, but may not be so lucky this time. (same jurisdiction). I was wondering whether I should paste the full shearwall schedule (table) into the plans along with a whole list of reference notes or wheather I should just make short notes specific to this plan only. I still need to have a good table available.

    Wendy and Lew: those were good sites. Thanks. Wendy I would appreciate the table and notes if any when your server gets back on line. I don't think I can import the table from that web site into my chief plan.

    Expanding on this subject, I am struggling with what amount of "NOTES" GENERAL NOTES" TABLES, SCHEDULES,REFERENCES etc. to include so that enough information is there, but not useless clutter. Although Building departments vary from place to place, nevertheless, I would be interested in getting other peoples thoughts on this. I know this has been touched on before, Thanks. Happy NY Bob L.

  9. #9
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    Expanding on this subject, I am struggling with what amount of "NOTES" GENERAL NOTES" TABLES, SCHEDULES,REFERENCES etc. to include so that enough information is there, but not useless clutter. Although Building departments vary from place to place, nevertheless, I would be interested in getting other peoples thoughts on this. I know this has been touched on before, Thanks. Happy NY Bob L.
    Hi Bob
    I would be interested in this to if you want to start a new thread..
    Think it depends on the job and what is not typical and needs to be explained..
    .........

    Allen Colburn Jr.
    Pascoag RI 02859
    Residential Design Drafting/Framer

    Drafter for:
    http://www.artformhomeplans.com/

    Chief Architect X4






  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Levin
    I was wondering whether I should paste the full shearwall schedule (table) into the plans along with a whole list of reference notes or wheather I should just make short notes specific to this plan only. I still need to have a good table available.
    A table is kind of useless unless you know what you are referencing. Your plans will show, say, a type "A", "B", "C" or maybe "6", "4", "3" (or whatever) shear wall in various locations. The schedule only tells you what that particular type of shear wall represents. A shear wall table without the specific shear wall types referenced on the plans is sort of like a window schedule without the window labels shown.
    Richard
    ---------------
    Richard Morrison
    Architect-Interior Designer
    X6 Premier, Win8 64
    http://www.richardmorrison.com

  11. #11
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    Richard: I understand the process of making annotations on the plans referencing tables. My point is, if you have a fairly large table with 10 or more types or configurations of shearwall and you are only referencing one of those types, maybe describing the specific shearwall with brief notes would be better.

    Iit may not be necessary to fill up sheets with tables and schedules and a large generic lists of reference notes. Then again, it may be faster to insert tables if they are blocked and in your library. Thanks Bob L.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Levin
    My point is, if you have a fairly large table with 10 or more types or configurations of shearwall and you are only referencing one of those types, maybe describing the specific shearwall with brief notes would be better.
    Yes, it would probably be better to keep things simple if you have only one shear wall type.

    What I was referring to, perhaps obtusely, is that each structural engineering firm is going to have their own preferred shear wall schedule and format; there is no "industry standard" schedule that I've ever seen. Where some firms are okay with a certain number of 5/8" bolts or A35 clips, for a given shear value, others will want more or less, based on their own field experiences or risk/comfort levels. They will also have their own nomenclature for different types of shear walls, as well as associated notes. So coming up with a predefined "universal" shear wall schedule is a fruitless task.

    Now it may be that you are working with a particular engineering firm on an ongoing basis. In that case, it may make sense to create a schedule for them that you can reuse.
    Last edited by RMorrison; 12-30-2006 at 06:39 PM.
    Richard
    ---------------
    Richard Morrison
    Architect-Interior Designer
    X6 Premier, Win8 64
    http://www.richardmorrison.com

  13. #13
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    each structural engineering firm is going to have their own preferred shear wall schedule and format

    Richard:

    Just trying to learn here, this is an area that isn't covered by the IRC codes or even the local permit dept codes ?

    Lew
    Lew Buttery
    Castle Golden Design - "We make dreams visible"

    Lockport, NY
    716-434-5051
    www.castlegoldendesign.com
    lbuttery at castlegoldendesign.com

    CHIEF X5 (started with v9.5)

  14. #14
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    Lew,

    There is a certain amount that is covered in the Code, but also a certain amount of professional judgment. For example, the UBC (on which the IRC is based, but I don't have IRC since it's not used here) allows a 3/8" plywood CDX panel, nailed 6" edge/12" field with 6d nails to handle 200 lbs/ft. However, an engineering firm, knowing that contractors often overdrive their nails in a significant number of cases, going through at least one ply of this 3-ply material (and thereby reducing the nailing strength by 1/3) might not even include 3/8" plywood on their schedules.

    Instead, their minimum typical shear wall will be 5-ply w/ 8d nails, good for 260 lbs./ft. Now a Simpson A35 clip angle is good for 450 lbs. (per their catalog) when used to transfer roof diaphragm loads from the eave blocking to a top plate, say. So, for 260 lbs./ft., you'd need one A35 at least every 1.73'. (450 lbs./260 lbs/ft.), or at least every 21" approx. Normal blocking would be every 16" or 24" though, depending on rafter spacing. You could put one A35 at every block at 16" o.c.and that would work, but what if the rafters are 24" o.c.? Some engineering firms might choose to downgrade the maximum shear value for that wall type to 225 lbs/ft and accept the 24" A35 clip spacing, others might choose to specify a different and stronger connector as typical in the schedule and keep the 260 lbs value for that wall type. Still others might say that 24" is close enough to 21" and just live with it even though it doesn't precisely calc out.

    Now aren't you glad you asked?
    Last edited by RMorrison; 12-30-2006 at 09:38 PM.
    Richard
    ---------------
    Richard Morrison
    Architect-Interior Designer
    X6 Premier, Win8 64
    http://www.richardmorrison.com

  15. #15
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    Richard:

    Thanks for the follow-up

    Lew
    Lew Buttery
    Castle Golden Design - "We make dreams visible"

    Lockport, NY
    716-434-5051
    www.castlegoldendesign.com
    lbuttery at castlegoldendesign.com

    CHIEF X5 (started with v9.5)

 

 

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